kzZbe3Vw_edited.jpg

Remembering 9/11

Attention: 
This exhibit includes sounds and images that may not be suitable for young children. Parental supervision is recommended. 

NlXlzSAw.jpeg

Events of 9/11

On September 11, 2001, the United States of America was attacked by 19 militants associated with al Qaeda, when they hijacked four airplanes in a suicide attack. The World Trade Center towers were struck by two airplanes and a third hit the Pentagon just outside of Washington D.C.  The fourth plane, Flight 93, was hijacked and as those on board heard the news regarding what had happened in New York and Washington DC, a group of passengers and flight attendants stepped in to ensure they did not reach their target. At 10:10am the plane crashed in a rural field near Shanksville in western Pennsylvania.  

 

On this day, almost 3,000 lives were lost. 

FDNY Radio Communications

Take a moment to listen to the FDNY radio communication from the morning of 9/11. 

00:00 / 02:24
September_17_2001.jpg
2880px-Dust_covered_911_victims.jpg
9-11-firefighter-2.jpg

Shard of Glass, World Trade Center

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

Piece of Marble, World Trade Center

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

Piece of Concrete, World Trade Center

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

8T2A3517.jpg

Fire Fighter Uniform worn on 9/11

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

Tools Utilized by FDNY on 9/11

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

Ashes from Ground Zero

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

8T2A3563.jpg

Memorial made from a World Trade Center Beam 

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

AdobeStock_1122885.jpeg

The attacks of September 11th were intended to break our spirit. Instead we have emerged stronger and more unified. We feel renewed devotion to the principles of political, economic, and religious freedom, the rule of law and respect for human life. We are more determined that ever to live our lives in freedom."

Rudy Giuliani, October 1, 2001

6142955344_55a7fdcd64_o.jpg

Resilience & Unity 

At 9pm the evening of September 11th, 2001, President Bush delivered a message to our nation from the Oval Office, "Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, but they can not touch the foundation of America. These acts shatter steel, but they cannot dent the steel of American resolve." On September 12, 2001, our nation came together as one and in the following days the United States was urged to return to a sense of "normalcy" and to not let the attacks on our nation instill fear. 

In response, Operation Enduring Freedom began to remove the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and destroy Osama bin Laden's network of terrorists. Many young men and women who witnessed the events of 9/11 from afar saw the actions of those who attempted to break the American resolve and chose to serve our great nation. 

The Clovis community answered the call. 

Clovis Community Gold Star Heroes

During the early days of World War I, a Blue Star was used to represent each person, man or woman in the Military Service of the United States.  As the war progressed and people were killed in combat, others wounded and died of their wounds or disease, there came about the accepted usage of the Gold Star. 

Below are the brave men and women who gave their lives during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. 

09-11-11_8032.JPG

Community Unites

Shortly after the events of September 11th, CEO of Pelco David McDonald created a memorial in Clovis, CA to honor the first responders who sacrificed their lives. In December of 2001, Mr. McDonald flew out 1,100 first responders from New York to dedicate the memorial. 

Each year at the memorial site, a group of citizens, first responders, and military personnel perform a ceremony in service traditions for the victims of September 11th. Honoring the brave spirit of those who sacrificed their lives to save others. 

343 FDNY Firefighters Emblem

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection

FDNY Honorary Chief helmet presented to David McDonald

Courtesy of the CA 9/11 Memorial Collection